What is ODS (Operational Data Store) and how it differs from Data Warehouse (DW)

December 17, 2014 Leave a comment

I see lot of people discussing about ODS, and citing their own definitions and ideas about it. Some people also use the name as a synonym for a Data Warehouse or Factory Database. Thus, at times it becomes very difficult to tell or convince people while you are designing or architecting a DW/BI solution.

–> So, I thought to give some time to explain what actually an ODS is.

Simple definition: An Operational Data Store (ODS) is a physical area in the Data Warehouse that contains the latest snapshot of the Operational Data. It is designed to contain low-level or atomic data with limited history for “Real Time” or “Near Real Time” (NRT) reporting on frequent basis.

Detailed definifion:
– An ODS is basically a database that is used for being an interim area for a data warehouse (DW), it sits between the legacy systems environment and the DW.
– It works with a Data Warehouse (DW) but unlike a DW, an ODS does not contain Static data. Instead, an ODS contains data which is constantly updated through the course of the Business Operations.
– It is specially designed such that it can Quickly perform relatively simply queries on smaller volumes of data.
– This is in contrast to the structure of a DW wherein one needs to perform complex queries on High volumes of data.
– As the Data ages in ODS it passes out of the ODS into the DW environment as it is.

–> Where does ODS fits in a DW/BI Architecture?

ODS_DW

–> Classes of ODS (Types):

Bill Inmon defines 5 classes of ODS shown in image below:

- Class-1 ODS would simply involve Direct Replication of Operational Data (without Transformations), being very Quick.
– Whereas Class-5 ODS would involve high Integration and Aggregation of data (highly Transformed), being a very time-consuming process.

ODS2

Microsoft Azure Redis Cache – General availability

September 25, 2014 2 comments

Azure_RedisCache

Microsoft today announced the general availability of Azure Redis Cache, as well as its related pricing changes.

Azure Cache is a family of distributed, in-memory, scalable solutions that enables you to build highly scalable and responsive applications by providing you super-fast access to your data. It’s based on the popular open source Redis Cache, and it gives you access to a secured, dedicated Redis cache that’s managed by Microsoft.

–> Microsoft offers following types of Azure Cache:

1. Azure Redis Cache: Built on the open source Redis cache. This is a dedicated service, currently in General Availability.
2. Managed Cache Service: Built on App Fabric Cache. This is a dedicated service, currently in General Availability.
3. In-Role Cache: Built on App Fabric Cache. This is a self-hosted cache, available via the Azure SDK.

–> This provides you:

1. High performance: Azure Redis Cache helps your application become more responsive, even as user load increases, and leverages the low-latency, high-throughput capabilities of the Redis engine. This separate distributed cache layer allows your data tier to scale independently for more efficient use of compute resources in your application layer.

2. Great features: Redis is an advanced key-value store, where keys can contain data structures. It supports a set of atomic operations on these data types, and it supports master/subordinate replication, with fast non-blocking first synchronization, auto-reconnection on net split, and more. Other features include transactions, Pub/Sub, Lua scripting, and keys with a limited time to live.

3. Easy to use and manage: Provision Redis cache using the Azure Management Portal. You can use Redis from most programming languages used today. Easily manage and monitor health and performance in the Azure Preview portal. Let Microsoft manage replication of the cache for increased availability.

4. Azure Managed Cache Service: Azure Managed Cache Service is based on the App Fabric Cache engine. It also gives you access to a secure, dedicated cache that is managed by Microsoft. A cache created using the Cache Service is also accessible from applications within Azure running on Azure Websites, Web & Worker Roles and Virtual Machines.

5. In-Role Cache: In-Role Cache is based on the App Fabric Cache engine. In-Role Cache allows you to perform caching by using a dedicated web or worker role instance in an application deployed to Microsoft Azure Cloud Services. This provides flexibility in terms of deployment options and size but you manage the cache yourself.

–> Microsoft Azure Redis Cache will be available in two tiers:

1. Basic: A Single Cache node. Multiple sizes. Ideal for Development/Test and non-critical workloads.
2. Standard: A replicated cache in a Two-node Primary/Secondary Configuration. Includes SLA and replication support. Multiple Sizes.

Cache is available in sizes from 250MB upto 53GB.

** Click here for PRICING DETAILS **


–> Just use your subscription on Microsoft Azure Portal to spin up a new “Redis Cache” service:

Azure06_RedisCache

–> Here is Step-by-Step documentation on how to use “Azure Redis Cache”, [link]

–> For more info on “Azure Caching” check my friend’s blog, [link] – Author: Ganesh Shankaran.


New Microsoft Azure Portal | Mind = Blown

August 27, 2014 Leave a comment

Microsoft recently announced a first-of-its-kind Cloud experience that brings together cross-platform technologies, services and tools, enabling developers and businesses to innovate at startup speed via a new Microsoft Azure Preview Portal.

“Developing for a mobile-first, cloud-first world is complicated, and Microsoft is working to simplify this world without sacrificing speed, choice, cost or quality,” said Scott Guthrie, executive vice president at Microsoft. “Imagine a world where infrastructure and platform services blend together in one seamless experience, so developers and IT professionals no longer have to work in disparate environments in the cloud. Microsoft has been rapidly innovating to solve this problem, and we have taken a big step toward that vision today.”

Windows AZURE is now Microsoft Azure!

New Portal: portal.azure.com
01_Azure_Portal



–> Check in this Video the new “AZURE Portal” & how DevOps just got a whole lot more awesome:


The new “Microsoft Azure” Portal provides a fully integrated experience that will enable customers to develop and manage an application in one place, using the platform and tools of their choice. The new portal combines all the components of a cloud application into a single development and management experience.

–> New components include the following:
1. Simplified Resource Management
2. Integrated billing
3. Gallery
4. Visual Studio Online
… for more info visit Microsoft Press, [link].


–> Easily Spin-Up a new “SharePoint Farm” in minutes:

You can see here on AZURE cloud how easily and in no time you can Spin-Up a new SharePoint Farm in minutes and few Clicks:
02_Azure_Portal_SharePointFarm

Azure also provides you various options to select SQL Server Plans based upon your preference and budget:
03_Azure_Portal_SharePointFarm_SQLPlans

Otherwise in an on-Premise environment or with any other vendor solution this would take days to setup a new Server (Hardware) with Windows Server OS, SharePoint, SQL Server, etc. installed and get things configured.


–> Spin-Up a new “SQL Database” in seconds:

Creating a new SQL Server instance is also very easy where you provide all necessary information in simple steps, like SQL Instance Name:
04_Azure_Portal_SQLServerDB_onAzure
The new instance will be created in seconds and you can access the Instance Create Databases, Tables, Views, other DB Objects and easily Query them via SSMS.


–> Microsoft Azure Offerings:
Apart from these 2 offerings that we saw above, Microsoft Azure provides lot more that you can browse in Azure Gallery:
05_Azure_Gallery

I’ll be exploring the new Portal as per my needs and post my experiences in coming posts, so stay tuned!

Start a Blog | Why, What, How, Where

August 5, 2014 Leave a comment

I started Blogging almost 5 years back (early 2009). That time I didn’t thought to blog publicly, but just created a blog site in Google’s Blogger.com to create and track a library of technical articles that I can access anywhere. Suddenly I started getting hits on my posts and people started asking questions and suggestions. Then I thought to give my blog a professional look and add some quality content.

I was quiet impressed with WordPress.com so moved my blog to this new hosting site and SQLwithManoj.wordpress.com came into life.

Last week I thought to port my blog to a dedicated Domain name, so I upgraded my account in WordPress only rather than going with other domain registering sites. Now the blog’s new address is SQLwithManoj.com, which is maintained by WordPress only.

Lot of people ask me about Blogging, like: how to start blogging, what platform they should use, what content they should put, domain name, space, themes, etc. Here through this blog post I’m trying to answer some of the FAQs.

–> Main points to consider:

1. What do I blog:
– Think on a topic or subject you are passionate about, where you have deep/sound knowledge and can write about it very frequently, like Technology (All, or any Particular like SQL, .net, Java, etc.), Photography, Travel, Fashion, Politics, etc.
– Some people also blog to promote their own business/products/companies, etc.
– Make sure the content you put is genuine and will help people in reality.

2. How do I setup my blog:
– You can start with any of the free Blog Hosting sites, like WordPress, Google’s Blogger, Tumblr, etc.
– Or can go with Paid options for these site or other Hosts like GoDaddy, where you will get your own custom URL (Domain name) with more control.

3. How frequent should I blog: Depends upon the Topic, Time and your Passion.
– If it is current affairs and/or trending stuff, then daily, but you should have ample time.
– If automobiles/movies or similar then you should be the first and best (or amongst them) to blog them whenever they are launched.
– If its Technology then it could be daily/weekly/monthly, but at least one/two blog(s) per month to keep your readers connected with you.

4. Some Do’s & Don’ts:
– Do not copy other people’s blog posts.
– You can write about same topics what others have already posted, but make sure to give your post a different title.
– Its Ok to take tips from other Blogs, but the content should be genuinely written by you and should make a difference when compared by others.
– Use Widgets to provide more information and ease of access to your users to navigate on your blog site.
– Use Themes to beautify your blog, and can tweak CSS to give it a different look.
– Don’t forget to put a Disclaimer on the blog so that you do not come under any issues.
– Associate your blog URL or site map with Search Engines, like Bing, Google, etc. for SEO, so that you get max traffic/hits.
– Use inbuilt or third-party Stat counter, Comments, PingBacks, Rating systems/widgets to know the influence & popularity of your blog.
– Popularize your blog with Social media like a Facebook Page, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc.

Let me know if you have any questions or need clarifications on these points.

Happy Blogging !!!

AdventureWorks 2014 Sample Database Released! – for SQL Server 2014 (Hekaton)

August 5, 2014 Leave a comment

Sample DataBases AdventureWorks 2014 for SQL Server 2014 has been released and is ready for download, [link].

The sample includes various flavors of samples that you can use with SQL Server 2014, and are:
1. OLTP Database
2. DW Database
3. Tabular Model Database
4. MultiDimensional Model Database

So download these now and start practicing and working on 2014!!!

SQLServer2014_AdventureWorks2014_Sample_DBs

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